Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

not yet...


I'm in ye mood to write--yet my mind is void of imaginary content, and I don't know where my pen wants to take me. It doesn't feel like writer's block, because if I had any actual ideas for stories I wou'd be working like a mad thing. One thing I usually do when I am confronted with this situation is try to write poetry, and I think I am going to give that a go once I return from driving Ghostboy to his work-place.

But my big aesthetic yen is to begin writing a new series of Sesqua Valley stories. The more I dwell on my creation, the more it seems an endless source of fictive possibilities. And, strangely, seeing that Twin Peaks has been revived also triggers a desire to revive my own valley. I began writing tales of Sesqua Valley in the 1970s, and it was strange and delightful when I watched a tv series that was inspir'd by the same source--North Bend in Washington State. As a kid I wou'd visit North Bend eery summer for two weeks, staying with my cousins, floating down the river on a tire tube, walking along the rail road tracks, and being hypnotized by the site of that amazing mountain.


My relatives actually climbed the mountain--something I never had ye chance to do. But I could sit and gaze on it for hours; and when I decided to write my own Lovecraftian tales, I knew I wanted to invent an eerie, sinister local--as Lovecraft had done when he invented Innsmouth and Dunwich--and base it on North Bend.

I cannot now remember when last I wrote a story about the valley. It is time to return. There is so much more I can investigate about this supernatural vale and its fantastic inhabitants. Ye time has come to make a serious effort.


Friday, June 9, 2017

to be publish'd in August


This is going to be a fabulous edition! Edited by David E. Schultz and S. T. Joshi, with jacket art by David C. Verba, this limited edition hardcover will be 800 pages and include:
Postcard to Clark Ashton Smith from Annhie E. P. Gamwell;
Lovecraft's review of Smith's EBONY AND CRYSTAL extracted from Supernatural Horror in Literature;
"Treader of Obscure Stars" by Clifford Gessler;
In re exhibitions of Smith's artwork from The Boiling Point;
and the following by Clark Ashton Smith:
[Fantasy and Human Experience]
C. A. Smith on Garbage-Mongering"
[Realism and Fantasy]
[On the Forbidden Books]
The Tale of Macrocosmic Horror
[Crossword Puzzles).

Available now at discount price of $65.00 (eventual price $75.00.

The publication of the fifteen-year correspondence of two...titans of weird fiction, H. P. Lovecraft (1890-1937) and Clark Ashton Smith (1893-1961) is a landmark event. This mammoth volume, containing 330 letters written between 1922 and 1937, allows an unprecedented glimpse into the lives, minds, and creative instincts of two brilliant writers who lived a continent apart and never met, but who shared a fascination withthe weird and the cosmic and had the highest regard for each other's work.

Lovecraft initiated the correspondence by writing a fan letter to Smith, who in 1922 was already an established poet. A warm exchange of views ensured; and as Lovecraft gained early success in Weird Tales, he urged Smith to send his poetry to the magazine. Smith, meanwhile, repeatedly read Lovecraft's stories in manuscript, and by the late 1920s he himself had begun to write tales of fantasy and science fiction that found ready acceptance in the pulp magazines of the day.

But the two authors were far more than pulp fictioneers. They held profound and at times conflicting views on the nature and purpose of weird fiction: Lovecraft admitted that he was a "prose realist," whereas Smith claimed that "I am far happier when I can create everything in a story." Their discussions on the theory of the weird tale are some of the most illuminating pages in this book.